Reclaiming Project

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What does it mean to reclaim?

First, it implies that something has been lost or taken away. In my opinion, there are many things in our communities and countries; in our waters, in the air and soil that have been stripped bare and have been taken advantage of.

To reclaim can mean to:

  1. retrieve or recover (something previously lost, given, or paid); obtain the return of.
  2. redeem (someone) from a state of vice; reform.
  3. bring (waste land or land formerly under water) under cultivation
  4. recover (material) for reuse; recycle

It is ironic that many of these meanings derive their meaning from nature, which is where I am going with this project.

Part of my Usui Reiki Master Teacher training is to preform attunements on people, plants, animals, sacred spaces, and sacred objects. I was encouraged to apply different attunement methods in various situations, and I was inspired to begin this project.

This peaked my interest – the concept of blessing the sacred.

However, it seems that there are many people out there who have lost the sacred. I was confronted by it head-on when many of my favourite hiking trails, which is where I encounter the sacred, littered repeatedly even though I and many others pick it up. I will find car tires, cigarette butts, broken beer bottles…

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I have always been quite the environmentalist and eco-warrior activist. So, it seems that now as a Reiki Master, my commitment to healing has been not only acerbated, but been forced to be a tad bit creative.

Reiki Masters ideally have a commitment to healing and achieving their own potential, and a strong desire to help others achieve theirs. Being a Reiki Master is not so much a job as it is a mission in which you become your authentic self and then support others in discovering and becoming their authentic selves. One of the central functions of a Reiki Master is performing ritual and teaching others about how to live in harmony with the Universe and their own inner nature.

A space can be attuned to the symbols and further opened to subtle energies, creating a
sacred space. The energies in attuned spaces become more coherent and then entrain the
energies of all within and all that should enter such spaces. As in all forms of energy
work, an elevated and loving consciousness and positive intent are key requirements for
optimal sacred space attunements.

William A. Tiller, Professor Emeritus of Stanford University’s Department of Materials
Science, has done extensive research into conscious acts of creation and has synthesized
several key factors regarding opening the heart and eliciting the unseen powers of the
universe (IONS 44). Tiller writes, “It is the practitioner’s love, compassion, devotion to
service and intent that can elicit the ‘unseen’ assistance of the universe to co-raise the Gauge symmetry of the intervening space, allowing the intention to be more fully
empowered” (Tiller 17).

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Objects can be attuned as well greatly enhancing their energy conduction and
amplification properties. Such attuned objects become dedicated to the Light that
cleanses, protects, and heals, and thus better serve when used for such purposes. As the
sacred objects become more coherent in their energies, they also entrain the energies of
other organisms and objects. These objects can be big or small, from a single grain of sand to a fully formed crystal cluster.

In addition to the process and ritual of blessing the sacred via Reiki, I was reminded by a group of Thai Ecology Monks who are attempting to stop deforestation by defending the trees by ordaining them.

Tree ordination is a ceremony initiated by Ecology Monks (Phra Nak Anuraksa), a group of Thai Buddhist Monks which has also practice by the Cambodian, Vietnam and Burmese Buddhist monks three decades ago.
The original idea behind the tradition is to use the widely respected symbol of monastic robes to make loggers hesitate to cut down trees. It is a combination of bringing the pre-Buddhist values of spirit worshiping and the Buddhist values of respecting the nature and the political messaging of saving the forests and trees from destructive development.

Sri Lankan Buddhist monks and environmentalist ordained the giant “Dun” tree in Baduraliya-Kukulegama road in 1997 and Red sandalwood tree in 2008 which were under threat of cutting down for road expansion. Both trees still remain untouched as people believe it as wrong to cut down ordained trees.

It provides a solution for widespread and rapid deforestation. “Ordaining” a tree is known as a provocative ritual which is a symbolic yet an influential monastic movement aimed at reversing environmental degradation and unsustainable economic development and consumerism that fuel it.

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All of this has inspired me to begin a project to attune trees in order to bring awareness of their innate sacredness. My hope is that with this, people will be less likely to litter, and treat the lands as they are: as sacred ground for all to enjoy but not to pollute.

By blessing trees, and marking them as such, my hope is that people will be less likely to pollute, and take stock of how their actions impact the environment, and paradoxically their and their loved one’s lives.

Now more than ever, we have the ability to reclaim the sacred and respect the Earth as our home, and not as our dump.

I will take this even further by attuning stone cairns on top of mountains, attuning gardens, and even trees in your own backyard. It won’t always be so dramatic, there really is no point in tee-peeing forests with prayer flags… but, there are ways to evoke the sacred without taking away from the natural beauty. Less is sometimes more. The sacred is all around us, it is all around you. By attuning and marking a tree in your own yard, you create a living altar to what you stand for; and you also create a sacred space where you can go and receive guidance, inspiration, and unconditional love. All things we can never get enough of.

REFERENCES

  1. http://www.nation.lk/edition/fine/item/24817-first-tree-ordination-ceremony-in-sri-lanka-solution-for-widespread-and-rapid-deforestation.html

Creative Commons Photography courtesy of Jannah Brown. Ed Schipul, Wonderlane, and Andy Arthur.

Tree ordination is a ceremony initiated by Ecology Monks (Phra Nak Anuraksa), a group of Thai Buddhist Monks which has also practice by the Cambodian, Vietnam and Burmese Buddhist monks three decades ago.
The original idea behind the tradition is to use the widely respected symbol of monastic robes to make loggers hesitate to cut down trees. It is a combination of bringing the pre-Buddhist values of spirit worshiping and the Buddhist values of respecting the nature and the political messaging of saving the forests and trees from destructive development.

Sri Lankan Buddhist monks and environmentalist ordained the giant “Dun” tree in Baduraliya-Kukulegama road in 1997 and Red sandalwood tree in 2008 which were under threat of cutting down for road expansion. Both trees still remain untouched as people believe it as wrong to cut down ordained trees.

It provides a solution for widespread and rapid deforestation. “Ordaining” a tree is known as a provocative ritual which is a symbolic yet an influential monastic movement aimed at reversing environmental degradation and unsustainable economic development and consumerism that fuel it.

– See more at: http://www.nation.lk/edition/fine/item/24817-first-tree-ordination-ceremony-in-sri-lanka-solution-for-widespread-and-rapid-deforestation.html#sthash.CfUg216p.dpuf

Tree ordination is a ceremony initiated by Ecology Monks (Phra Nak Anuraksa), a group of Thai Buddhist Monks which has also practice by the Cambodian, Vietnam and Burmese Buddhist monks three decades ago.
The original idea behind the tradition is to use the widely respected symbol of monastic robes to make loggers hesitate to cut down trees. It is a combination of bringing the pre-Buddhist values of spirit worshiping and the Buddhist values of respecting the nature and the political messaging of saving the forests and trees from destructive development. – See more at: http://www.nation.lk/edition/fine/item/24817-first-tree-ordination-ceremony-in-sri-lanka-solution-for-widespread-and-rapid-deforestation.html#sthash.CfUg216p.dpuf

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